Pet Peeves: Social Media Edition

I love social media. Sure, it has its downfalls – like face-to-face interactions overtaken by technology, anonymity that makes bullies feel brash, less personal privacy…the list could go on forever if we wanted it to. But social media also has a lot of great benefits, like connecting people from around the world, sharing stories and pictures, opening doors to what the rest of the world has to offer, and it gives us the ability to connect with our favorite companies and brands.

Many of my social media pet peeves arise from how people use social media.  Dozens of game requests bogging down my notifications, poor use of grammar and spelling, hashtags on Facebook (am I the only one bothered by this!?), redundant content…just some of the things that tend to grind my social media gears.

One such example: I have a friend or two who consistently and frequently post complaints about their jobs, their coworkers, everything and anything they have on their plate.  I get it – it always feels great to vent a little and let out some stress and frustration – but I personally don’t think that doing so on social media is the route to take.

Why you ask?

Well, for starters, you never know who could stumble across one of your heat-of-the-moment grumblings.  What if it was a coworker you had complained about? Or your boss? A future employer?  Are those really the messages you want to send to the people in your life? Is that really the professional identity you want to establish on the Internet?  If we’re being honest, I know I get incredibly annoyed by friends whose complaints constantly pepper my various news feeds – I get it, no one wants to have to work, but if you’re blessed enough to have a  job in the current economy, recognize that while you may not have the job of your dreams, you have something giving you income and experience.  Unless you’ve just won the lottery and are set for life, no one should stick their nose up at either of these!

My advice for unhappy employees:

Take a few deep breaths or head outside for a walk.  Afterwards, ask yourself whether what was bothering you is worth complaining about.  Chances are, it probably isn’t.

Find a body to vent to; your friend, your roommate, your mom, your dog, anyone who you can trust not to broadcast what you’re saying.

Get a journal – not a blog – a real, paper journal and vent there.  Then go back a few days later and read what you wrote. You’ll probably realize that whatever was frustrating you was pretty insignificant in the scheme of things.

Consider addressing your discontent – rationally and calmly – with the people directly involved, whoever they may be.  Communicate!! After all, they might not know that they’re causing you stress.

And, if you find you’re still unhappy…it might be time to search for a new job.

What social media habits drive you crazy and momentarily make you want to cancel your accounts and go off the grid? Let me know what your social media pet peeves are!

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And the job search continues…

Let me preface this post by saying I don’t mean this to be a sob story – because I’m incredibly grateful what I do have – but, long story short, I’ve been on the hunt for a new job.  With my recently acquired Master’s degree under my belt I really want to segway into a job more in line with what I’m interested in, and let me tell you, it’s not easy.  I’ve been scouring job postings for entry-level jobs in marketing, public relations, and communications and nearly every entry-level job requires ‘3 to 5 years’ of experience.

 Hold up.

This doesn’t make sense to me.  Now don’t get me wrong, I understand that in today’s job market individuals are expected to have completed internships to gain some real world experience – and I’ve done some of those myself.  My issue is that, realistically, it’s not easy to work as an intern (often unpaid) for three years when I have rent, bills, and student loans to pay.  My other issue: I work hard. I don’t like not knowing how to do something and I’ll admit, I’m competitive and I don’t like being second best, so for me, even though I might lack experience, I know that I could take on most of these jobs and grasp them pretty quickly.  I don’t want anything handed to me, but I do want a company to take a chance on me (I’m not stupid, I know that the chances of some fairy-godmother company sweeping me up are pretty slim – but a girl can dream).

So all in all, I feel forced into a corner – a corner where I’m applying for retail and somewhat secretarial customer service jobs because I don’t ‘qualify’ for entry-level jobs in the fields I want to work in.  Frustrating to say the least, but such is life, so all I can do is keep pushing and trying to get experience all on my own.  And if anyone wants to see my resume…no seriously, if want to see it, please ask.

No one ever said success was easy, right?

My Online Identity

It was pretty interesting reviewing my social media walls, especially as I searched farther and farther in the past; my usage, habits, and shared identity have evolved pretty significantly. Out of all my current social media sites, I’ve used Facebook the longest. I used to post multiple times a day, typically about mundane daily events or articles I had come across.  Scrolling through my wall, I noticed a significant evolution in my Facebook habits about two years ago; I started posting less and less frequently as time went on.  My more recent posts were about bigger life events (although I still post and share articles or funny pictures) and less about how I’m feeling on a given day.  One thing that hasn’t really changed throughout my Facebook posts is that they typically don’t reveal anything overly personal; I don’t post ‘woe is me’ statuses or super negative statuses.  I always avoid sharing a post when a family member dies, or I experience a life roadblock, rather I try to focus on positive life events – things that I think are worth sharing.  I don’t want all of my Facebook friends to know when I’m going through a rough time because I feel like that’s what my close friends and family are for.

Looking at my other social media pages, I would say I have similar habits but there has been less of an evolution in my habits on these other sites.  On Twitter I’ve always had a ‘day in the life’ kind of posting habit; I tweet quick tidbits about what I’m thinking, where I am, or what I’m doing.  I don’t share many articles or websites on Twitter, instead using the platform as more of a soundboard for where I’m at in my day/life.  Looking through my Instagram and blog were probably the most interesting (a majority of my blog posts are pictures) because the posts on each platform revealed some themes.  Many of my Instagram photos are of nature/food/random weird things/my surroundings; I have very few ‘selfies’ because I prefer to document what’s around me. It got me thinking. I think the biggest reason I avoid ‘selfies’ is because I get to see myself every day; I get to see amazing sights or a delicious new food not as often.  Sharing my surroundings also gives my family and friends a more realistic picture of what I’m up to.  My blog had a slightly different theme.  Like Instagram, it contains many pictures of nature because I love to travel, but it also contains quotes and pictures that evoke emotion or make me think twice.  Overall I would say that I’ve used my blog as a hybrid means of self-development and inspiration.

In thinking about each my social media platforms, it seems that most of my postings convey who I am and who I want to be as a person; they convey my values, things I like to do, and my personality.  Comments on certain posts mean a lot to me, whereas comments on other posts are nice but mean less.  For example, if I post about a personal accomplishment or an interesting article, comments from my friends or family help reaffirm my success, my ability to overcome something, or the relevancy of things I find interesting.

In reviewing my social media postings, I think the main reason I post and share on these platforms is to connect with people I normally wouldn’t be able to connect with – family far away, friends back home, etc.  These platforms offer me a way to stay in touch and maintain a relationship similar to one I would have with them in person.  For example, now I might share a webpage with my college roommate on Facebook because we live on opposite sides of the country.  If she and I were still roommates, I would probably tell her about the same webpage while we were both lounging around; the ability to share it online allows to maintain the relationship we had when we were in the same state.

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